Jump to content

what's the difference or definitions?


17 replies to this topic

#1
garbage7

  • Members
  • 15 posts
what is the difference between a lesbian, queer, etc... we need a list does any one know the answers or broad definitions of the common labels? You know for us baby lesbians.

#2
dandy_lionness

  • Members
  • 37 posts
I think labels mean different things for different people. Some people use 'queer' as a political statement meant to demistify its "odd" connotation and rather adopt a sense of pride with the word. Others say 'queer' as a way to cover all possibilities - they will date a woman, man, trans, or other irrespective of gender. I'd say that 'dyke' and 'lesbian' pretty much mean the same thing, but again, it's all about personal taste. Some women are offended by 'dyke'. 'Trans', 'transgender', 'transsexual'. simply mean someone who identifies as a gender that is different from what was assigned to them at birth.

Whatever ya are, it's all good.


That's Dandy :roll:
What do you mean there's nothing in my Cracker Jack box?

#3
Carrie

  • Members
  • 43 posts
I feel like "dyke" has more negative connotations... I think people use it as a slur more often than lesbian.
"Lesbian" reminds me of greek islands and Sappho, so maybe its just me.
I would never feel comfortable using the word "dyke" just as I wouldn't use the word "fag" but again this is personal preferences and I'm sure other people feel differently.
"Where are you now? I'm trying to get by with never knowing at all. What is the chance of finding you out there? Or do I have to wait forever?"
~Michelle Branch

#4
melissah

  • Members
  • 8 posts
Odd, Carrie, because I would identify with 'dyke' before 'lesbian'. Taking a derogatory nickname ('nigga', 'dyke', 'fag', 'wog' ... whatever) and using it within your own group imasculates the word to a certain degree.

Any of these identities can sound derogatory, even the most respectable of them, with the right inflection. I've heard 'lesbian' used in a more disgusting manner than any of the others.

But to answer the initial question, all of the sexual identities that are listed in the name of this forum are really just different ways to describe oneself.

Oh, and I think 'omnisexual' is another term for 'bisexual'; perhaps it is a little broader, pertaining to transgender as well ('bi-' meaning 'two' and 'omni-' meaning 'all'). Pansexual is the same thing - again, it all comes down to what you want to be called ... and it's good to see that the bisexuals out there have something to call ourselves other than 'lesbo lite'!

Best thing to do is what you're doing ... someone brings up a word, just ask what it means! If you're too shy to do this you can do a search online. The lesbianworlds.com glossary has a list of twenty of the most common phrases and alternative sexuality culture, so you should check it out if you're still curious as to what some things mean.

Hope this helps!

#5
Carrie

  • Members
  • 43 posts
Oh my god... Lesbian Lite... I love it. HHAHAHAHA Actually I might use that :wink:
"Where are you now? I'm trying to get by with never knowing at all. What is the chance of finding you out there? Or do I have to wait forever?"
~Michelle Branch

#6
dmevans

  • Members
  • 5 posts
hello, new here so be gentle, :P

Queer is just a slur, could be used as slang, or as an insult to gays. Do what I did: I used Google to look up the meanings. There's so many new labels that's what I ended up doing. heh.

I maybe behind the times somewhat but, for me dyke all the way. When I was younger and growing up there was only two Identities: you were either described as dyke or lesbian. Dyke was male, lesbian female so all that seems to have changed these days. Was simple back then lol. There's far too many labels now. Meh. I describe myself the way I am. So what are the terms these days? Butch & femm???? I perfer dyke over butch for my own reasons. Butch to me means your a 'tomboy' but, l feel 'politically correct' labels are stupid. I personally, don't like to be labelled as 'butch.' Now all of a sudden dyke is racial slur? Not where I come from. I've been surfing lots of gay sites lately and some of the labels boggle my mind, I'm like what the heck??? How 2 simple terms for so long grew into so many is beyond me. Someone somewhere sitting behind a desk thinking: we need more labels for lesbians to describe themselves, hmmm. lmao. ;)




(my 2 cents)

#7
Guest_Anonymous_*

  • Guests
This might be off topic but...whatever...I just had to say this...

Quote

Taking a derogatory nickname ('nigga', 'dyke', 'fag', 'wog' ... whatever) and using it within your own group imasculates the word to a certain degree.
I totally disagree with this statement...that whole taking a derogatory nickname, and using it to imasculate a group of people is total bullshit...I say this because if the wrong person...(lets say a homophobic individual) came out and called any woman here...a dyke, or any off the wall term for that matter...I think that it would offend them somewhat...the same goes for if a white racist, came up behind me...and said something like "hey nigga...wheres the sky?"...I might just go to jail again :roll:

People tend to respond...differently...to different things...

#8
Troublemaker

  • Members
  • 26 posts

Quote

How 2 simple terms for so long grew into so many is beyond me. Someone somewhere sitting behind a desk thinking: we need more labels for lesbians to describe themselves, hmmm. lmao. ;)

*laugh*

Hi dm, i know what you mean about the labels. they're spreading like crazy! *grin* sometimes i feel that using more and more labels to make finer and finer distinctions just keeps us separated. but then other times i think it can help us understand each other better. so i guess i can see both sides of this one!

if it were just about me and how i feel, i probably wouldn't be fussed with labeling my sexuality much at all. sometimes i get turned on, sometimes i get turned off, sometimes it relates to another human (or 2 ;) ).

on the other hand...

a (somewhat speculative) story: for a long time, in England, male homosexuality was illegal. but female homosexuality was simply not mentioned in lawbooks. basically, people didn't think it existed. so you had heterosexuals (men and women), and homosexuals (who were all men).

eventually, intimate or erotic connections between women came to be recognized. maybe some early woman-loving-women tried to join gay men's groups, and found themselves denied membership because "real" homos couldn't be women (after all, women are immature and irresponsible and can't make up their minds *grin*). those women started calling themselves "sapphists" and "lesbians". i suppose that at the time, lots of people rolled their eyes and said "How 2 simple terms for so long grew into so many is beyond me..."

yours in sapphist sisterhood,
troublemaker

#9
zami

  • Members
  • 29 posts

Quote

but female homosexuality was simply not mentioned in lawbooks. basically, people didn't think it existed.

ha! so true! wasn't it queen victoria who declared this? ah, queen victoria - you and your colonialist ideas about race AND sexuality. what can we say? queen and queer are just one letter apart!

actually, the history of naming is soooo interesting. 'Homosexuality' and 'heterosexuality' as identities didn't exist until the late 19th and early 20th centuries in the West. i find it remarkable that since then, a plethora of available namings have erupted to describe not only identities, but also sexualities...

i love my identity labels. i've moved inside and within categories my whole life, and i know that fer sure at times they can be fluid - but at other times, they can be so static, as to box you in. for example, my racial identity in Canada is solid - non-white. But when i travel to the Caribbean, so many facets of my racial history are at play depending on what circles I am in - black/indo/dougla...

queer works best for me at the moment as it does feel like there is more room to move. but then again, "lesbian" is more intelligible to folks - even if at this time in my life, i don't identify as a 'woman who loves other women."

i know that keith boykin, a US black gay man, believes that black folks don't ID as queer as they believe it to be a white term. his solution is "same gender loving" - hmm...kinda marginalizes those of us whose gender id isn't all that easily recognizable and/or stable now does it?
"If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive" ~ Audre Lorde

#10
elmakr

  • Members
  • 2 posts
I'm with Michael Stipe on this (he actually talked about it in an interview), i prefer "queer" all the way. I understand that some people might think it's offensive because of its connotation of something that's off, "bent," or otherwise abnormal...but really i don't think the term 'normal' has any meaning in the first place...i think "queer" is liberating to me because it doesn't limit me to being a lesbian, or being bisexual, but just to being my own quirky, irregular, unpredictable self.

if that makes any sense at all.





1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users