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What Are You Reading Now?

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I love picking up suggestions by seeing what others are reading, and bragging about (or slamming) what's currently on my plate, so start sharing.

What are you reading?

I'm currently working on Dan Brown's "The Lost Symbol" (s'ok), The latest Sookie Stackhouse novel (also ok), and Eve Ensler's "I am an emotional creature" (spectacular).

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I just finished Joyce Carol Oates' "Foxfire." The movie version was mediocre, but the book is incredible. It made me really excited to be who I am.

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I only heard about Foxfire through the excellent lesbian teen's book Hello, Groin. I'm glad to hear it's good!

I'm currently reading 50 Gay and Lesbian Books Everyone Should Read. I like it overall, but so far it's way more gay than lesbian.

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Now I want to read Hello, Groin. Another incredible book is the graphic novel Skim by Mariko and Jillian Tamaki. It's a coming of age story with beautifully lush artwork. It's very worth reading.

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Keeping You a Secret by Julie Anna Peters 

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I just finished Joyce Carol Oates' "Foxfire." The movie version was mediocre, but the book is incredible. It made me really excited to be who I am.

Hate (well, that may be too strong a word) myself for not having read more Oates. She's a great writer. Potentially Nobel great. Them is one of the most emotionally arresting books I've ever read. It's the only thing of hers I've read though. I'm not sure why. Part of it is because she's so intimidating. In the sense that she's so prolific I mean. I have a tendency when I latch onto a writer to devour every word she (or he) ever wrote. With Oates, that would be quite an undertaking. Doesn't mean, however, that I've given up on the idea (or intention) of eventually tackling her.

Not unlike you, I saw a movie version of one of her books...on Lifetime. We Were the Mulvaneys. Didn't realize while I was watching it that it was based on an Oates book, but found out later. The movie was actually very good. An emotional gut-wrencher that rose well above your typical Lifetime fare. Anyway...I bought the book...but I haven't read it yet. Fully intend to soon though. I've heard a lot of great things about Foxfire as well. Its time too will come.

As to what I'm reading now...I'm just going to paste this here. I posted it on the Private Group Boards earlier:

Recently finished reading a book called How to Buy a Love of Reading by Tanya Egan Gibson. It's a satiric novel in its way, but it's also strangely affecting emotionally. Sweet and bitter and bittersweet...all at the same time. It's the story of these nouveau riche New Yorkers. A couple hires a writer of pretentious meta-fiction (she's desperate for $$$) to write a book for their apathetic daughter's Sweet Sixteen party. Copies are to be given out as party favors to the party guests. The book is to be written to the express specifications of the Birthday Girl herself. Hijinks ensue. And heartache. Objectively speaking, this book may not be entirely successful as a cohesive work of fiction. Subjectively though...I liked and enjoyed it. I laughed, I cried. I felt that wonderful sense of loss (didn't want the last page to come) when it was over. There's also a Gatsby (my favorite book) connection that weaves its way though the novel.

Currently reading Ken Kesey's Sometimes a Great Notion. It's a book I've started several times before but could never quite follow through with. Very difficult book to get a handle on stylistically. Not quite James Joyce, but disjointed and experimental enough to make my mention of Joyce understandable. Think I'm going to make it through this time though. Well past halfway and I'm pretty comfortable now with the style (or should I say the ever-shifting style?).

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Recently finished Bossypants by Tina Fey and The Keepsake by Tess Gertisen.

Bossypants is a humorous biography about Tina Fey's life. It takes you through her seemingly awkward childhood and teen years and her position as the first woman head writer on SNL. I'm a huge fan of hers and this just made me respect her more.

The Keepsake is apart of the Rizzoli & Isles series that is currently being aired on TNT. Unfortunately I find the show rather disappointing, because the plot isn't that well thought out. The book though is very gripping and a good mystery. The Surgeon is the first book in the series.

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On August 30, 2010 at 5:56 PM, stolenlover54 said:

Keeping You a Secret by Julie Anna Peters 

 

AWESOME BOOK. in fact, i don't think there's a book she's made that i don't like.

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yeah...i know its old hat, but in 1983 Katherine V Forrest's book Curious Wine was first published. It is making a comeback! an anniversary edition was released by Bella Books (i came a little late to the scene, and found out today that Naiad Press is no longer in business) in 2011.

It is a classic, and for very good reasons.

I cant say, honestly, that i am a connoisseur of lesbian fiction (or nonfiction)...but that if there are other books as intelligent as this one i will read them!

I found it last night among my books as i was moving some of my generous book collection from my parent's house to my new condo. I remembered that in fall of 2010 one of my friends was going through her books to clean out her office to make a bedroom for her girlfriend's son. I had just ended my first relationship (of any sort) and was glad to be done with girlfriends and all that. I planned to never fall in love with anyone ever again. Just me and my dogs. For the rest of my life. She gave it to me, saying, "oh...by the way when you get a chance read this." Her smile told me it was one of those. A lesbian romance. Which i had never been bold enough to read, and now wasnt sure if i wanted to read. I took it.

And now here i was, two years and another failed relationship later, looking down at its unassuming cover. Hell, it might be a good book. Who am i to judge a book by its subject matter? and since it was first published in 1983 it wouldnt be too sexually explicit? Besides Laurie would not give me a book that was too risque.

So i curled up on my loveseat under my favorite fleece blanket with one dog at my feet and the other with his head in my lap.

And i was in for a pleasant surprise! The title referred to a line from a poem by my favorite poet, Emily Dickinson. And the characters were intelligent and relateable. not at all what i had expected from a romance novel! Yes, there were some "steamy" scenes and a lot of love-making, but it did not kill the book with its intrusions. Actually, it made me wonder what it feels like to let somebody touch you like that? and if it really does bring two people closer together? and is it true that it really, really, really does not hurt?

I have my doubts. but for a few moments, while reading this book, i believed.

And now i want to read more. and talk to people. and meet people. and go on dates. and experience life (i dont have to go to the nunnery now and pretend to believe all that Catholic stuff!) and maybe, oneday? i might write my own lesbian novel. If i can write one as powerful and as tender and as moving as Curious Wine, then i will die a happy woman.

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I just finished 'Earth Abides' by George R. Stewart

I recommend it.

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The Island Beneath the Sea by Isabel Allende

And not so patiently waiting for The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman to come out...

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On December 28, 2011 at 0:37 PM, blueagle888 said:

AWESOME BOOK. in fact, i don't think there's a book she's made that i don't like.

 

Agreed, she's one of my favorite authors. I'm currently reading Parrotfish by Ellen Wittlinger. I've only read a little bit of it, but I really like that book. Also recently read Stone Butch Blues by Leslie Feinberg which was a-freaking-mazing 

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To the Lighthouse.. Virginia Woolf

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currently reading the recent issue of Shotgun News as well as Beekeeping for Beginners

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I'm currently reading Nicola Griffith's first book in the Aud Torvingen series, The Blue Place. It's hard for me to get into because the main character isn't exactly very likable. She's super tough and brilliant but closed off to people, stand offish, condescending, and I think a bit rude. I like to read books about everyday women who aren't six feet tall, who can't beat up people on the streets, yet are compassionate, funny, and have some amazing talent.

My last guilty indulgence that I enjoyed was The Gravity Between Us by Kristen Zimmer. Very fun, light reading. It's the unhealthy dessert kind of reading that one should only do once in a while else your mind turns to mush due to lack of deep, meaningful thought or learning.

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I just started Ink and Bone by  Lisa Unger. No real  opinion as of yet. 

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I just finished The Unquiet Dead by Ausm Zehanat Khan and plan on starting her next book The Language of Secrets. I highly recommend her books. The first one dealt with the slaughter of Bosnian Muslims during the 1990s and how the international world just stood by and let it occur. Sarajevo, Srebenica, Tuzla...all these places are mentioned. The main characters are skillfully drawn, and historical material is woven into the plot in an interesting way. The book really made me aware that genocide still takes place. I'm looking forward to the second and seeing what issues she addresses therein.

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I just started American Gods by Neil Gaiman (i'll be needing to buy everything he's ever written) and War Without End: Israelis, Palestinians, And The Struggle For A Promised Land by Anton LaGuardia. I have no complaints.

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Anything by Gaiman is well worth reading! I liked American Gods though Anasazi Boys was my favorite. I've read War W/o End, too. He does a very good job of addressing a complicated subject. My current reads: The Next Pandemic by Ali S. Khan (nonfic) and It Takes One by Kate Kessler (fic). I confess a predilection for apocalyptic books-those about the the NBO (the next big one) in whatever format, be it pandemic, storm, earthquake, or even EMP.  I, being a pessimist, don't think the human race has much longer to continue its hegemony of the planet. We've done a piss-poor job of managing it-pretty much trashed every place we've lived, been responsible for the extincttion of innumerable species, and polluted the atmosphere. Personally, I'm hoping for a singularity event whereby one or more AIs gain control of the planet!

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Currently reading What the Robin Knows: How Birds Reveal the Secrets of the Natural World by Jon Young. 

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Current books are The Birth Of The Anthropocene by Jeremy Davies (NF) and King's Folly by Jill Williamson (F/Fantasy). Both are very good.

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Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson. I'm only 200 pages in (out of 1100), but I'm already prepared to recommend it.

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White Trash by Nancy Isenberg (NF); Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance (NF); both deal with the Anglo-Saxon underclass, Isenberg from a sociological and historical perspective, Vance from a biographical one. Also read Adam Haslett's novel Imagine Me Gone. It is on my shortlist of books that can change your life. I read it a couple of weeks ago and am still thinking about it and reexamining my life in new ways as a consequence. It is an extraordinary book in sfor so many reasons.

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Peter Swanson "the kind worth killing"

if you're into that sort of thing 

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Dani28 said:

I just started American Gods by Neil Gaiman (i'll be needing to buy everything he's ever written) and War Without End: Israelis, Palestinians, And The Struggle For A Promised Land by Anton LaGuardia. I have no complaints.

The Sandman series is great too. The mysticism and the re-imagining of mythos is pure gold.

Currently reading: Unnatural Fire by Fidelis Morgan; and trying to get through Philosophy of Science

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